#ReadCaribbean Challenge

Together with a group of handpicked Caribbean bookstagrammers, this June, I am getting involved with a #ReadCaribbean challenge on Instagram to encourage more readers to discover Caribbean literature.

June 2019 is recognized as Caribbean Heritage Month so to celebrate, we’re encouraging you to:

  1. read books by Caribbean nationals
  2. read books about the Caribbean
  3. read books set in the Caribbean

Here are some prompts to get you inspired! Are you on board?

Review: Cuba Then, Cuba Now

Firstly, I found Cuba Then, Cuba Now, the title of the Vintage Short by travel writer Joshua Jelly-Shapiro, to be a bit misleading. It promised reflective essays on Cuba – then and now, but the bulk of the book spoke about another Caribbean island, Jamaica. In fact, Cuba Then, Cuba Now included many excerpts from Shapiro’s first book, Island People: The Caribbean and the World.

Shapiro’s three chapters on Jamaica certainly brought the island alive with keen observations of its people, history, and culture. I liked that the narrative voice was attuned to Jamaican patois, particularly the brand spoken by its Rastafarian community.

The introduction and the chapter on Cuba, however, somehow didn’t make much of an impact on me as a Caribbean-born reader and writer. That said, I enjoyed reading this title and would really like to read Island People next.

Disclaimer: I received this book as a digital Advance Reader Copy (ARC) from the publishers in exchange for my honest review.

Have you read it?

6 literary quotes about the Caribbean immigrant experience

Immigration is on everyone’s lips these days, especially with tightening national borders and refugee crises. That said, the migration of Caribbean people has always been a tumultuous one. You may not know this but most of the people in the Caribbean migrated to the region from other parts of the world: Africa, India, Europe, China, and the Middle East to name a few. After this first migration, many then left their new “homelands” for developed countries, particularly the US, the UK, and Canada. Want to learn more about their migratory experiences? Here are 6 literary quotes about the Caribbean immigrant experience.

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The Mimic Men (1967) by VS Naipaul

“Shipwreck: I have used this word before. With my island background, it was the word that always came to me. And this was what I felt I had encountered again in the great city: this feeling of being adrift, a cell in preparation, little more, that might be altered, if only fleetingly, by any encounter.”

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The Lonely Londoners (1956) by Samuel Selvon

“Harris is a fellar who like to play ladeda, and he like English customs and thing, he does be polite and say thank you and he does get up in the bus and the tube to let woman sit down, which is a thing even them Englishmen don’t do. And when he dress, you think is some Englishman going to work in the city, bowler and umbrella, and briefcase tuck under the arm, with The Times fold up in the pocket so the name would show, and he walking upright like if is he alone who alive in the world. Only thing, Harris face black.”

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‘Til the Well Runs Dry (2014) by Lauren Francis-Sharma

“New York City was like the deepest deepness of Blanchisseuse. A city bush where people, rather than animals, slithered and lurked, where people, rather than trees, smashed and bumped. In the city-bush, like in the bush of Blanchisseuse, there was barely a sky…I could sense, as I watched them, – all of them – behaving repressively wild, with fear and dread built up behind the whites of their eyes, that none of them knew how to get out either.”

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The Amazing Absorbing Boy (2010) by Rabindranath Maharaj

“I remember Uncle Boysie telling me that Canada was so safe the policemen wore nice red outfits and rode on horses but according to Roy the country was like Gotham City with crooks around every corner… I pictured them as shady Frank Miller characters with bulging muscles and machine guns poking out from trench coats but the photograph from the papers was of a group of boys my age. They kind of resembled some of my friends from Mayaro too.”

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The Swinging Bridge (2003) by Ramabai Espinet

“If you happen to be born into an Indian family, an Indian family from the Caribbean, migratory, never certain of the terrain, that’s how life falls down around you. It’s close and thick and sheltering, its ugly and violent secrets locked inside the family walls. The outside encroaches, but the ramparts are strong, and once you leave it you have no shelter and no ready skills for finding a different one. I found that out after years of trying.”

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The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao (2007) by Junot Diaz

“Once you’ve been fuera, Santo Domingo is the smallest place in the world.”